Why I Don’t Fault Mitt Romney for his Taxes

Mitt Romney’s tax documents were released today and a lot of people are up in arms about it. I’ll just fill you in ahed of time about me. I’m a very liberal Democrat who fully plans to vote for Obama again this year because I like him and think that he is doing the very best job he possibly can in the situation presented to him. You are welcome to tell me why this is a bad idea, but until a Republican candidate comes along that isn’t homophobic, doesn’t tell me what to do with my uterus and doesn’t want to make this the United State of Jesus Christ, I won’t be persuaded.

Anyway, back to Mitt Romney and the outrage. I am not one of the outraged. Yes, Mitt has off shore accounts, yes he only paid 14% of his yearly income in taxes, but the fact is that it was totally legal. And I can’t blame Mitt for that.

I blame Congress.

There have been many, many attempts to change tax policies. The people have spoken, repeatedly, and they want the wealthy to be taxed more to help manage the deficit. And yet, the Republican caucus continues to block all attempts to, you know, raise revenue for our badly indebted country because they are protecting the extremely wealthy. Like Mitt Romney.

Mitt Romney simply did what was legal. He paid what he was supposed to pay and he has legal bank accounts. Sure, keeping bank accounts in the Cayman Islands is totally smarmy, but we’re talking politicians here. If you’re not expecting them to do seriously smarmy things you’re kidding yourself.

Should Mitt pay more? Ethically and in terms of what’s best for the country he wants to lead, yes, absolutely. He should pay the same tax rate as his constituents. He should not be able to hide money away overseas, but this is the legal hole we dug, now we need to lie in it without blaming him.

We need to lie in it or we need to get outraged at the people who made this possible. Don’t yell at Mitt, I am an absolute believer in giving taxes to the government pay for social welfare programs, but just like anyone else, I wouldn’t pay a dollar more than asked. And I don’t expect Mitt to be any different.

Write to your congressman, tell him or her that you want fair taxes, that the wealthy should never pay a smaller percentage of their income that low and middle class families. If you can’t see how wrong that is, then I can never understand you.

We absolutely need to do something different in this country. We need to get rid of these Bush era tax cuts. They don’t spur the economy, they allow millionaires to keep more of their money that the middle class and they are preventing us from pulling in valuable revenue.

I’m not asking you to agree but for the love of all that is good, don’t vote for Newt Gingrinch because of Mitt Romney’s taxes (I mean, really don’t vote for Newt at all, but definitely not for this). Being rich and smart is unfortunately not a crime, no matter how frustrating it may be to those of us who don’t fulfill the former attribute.

Blame Congress. And in November, elect officials who are going to represent the will of the people, not the will of the elite.

12 Responses to “Why I Don’t Fault Mitt Romney for his Taxes”

  • “You are welcome to tell me why this is a bad idea, but until a Republican candidate comes along that isn’t homophobic, doesn’t tell me what to do with my uterus and doesn’t want to make this the United State of Jesus Christ, I won’t be persuaded.”

    Oh. My. God. That’s just PERFECT. I plan on using that statement in every political conversation I have during this election year. And beyond. Consider your logic stolen, lady. (With due credit, of course.)

    [Reply]

    Al_Pal Reply:

    @Chelsie, Yeah, that quote is perfect.
    No homophobic uterine-rulers for me, thanks so much. ;p

    [Reply]

  • I’m an Obama backer too, but please, Mitt made up that 15% – that I paid and he didn’t – by giving it to charity. I say he’s up to 30%.

    [Reply]

    Stephen Reply:

    @TheQueen, Actually, yesterday after Mitt released his returns, the total he paid in taxes and gave to charity was over 40%. I’m not a Romney fan mostly because in his heart of hearts, his bedrock core belief is that someday if he does things right he’s going to become a God and get his own planet to rule over. That’s right up there with Scientologist’s beliefs about space aliens putting thetans in volcanos. You have the right to believe what you want, but I question your judgement. Despite that, still, the over 40% is pretty impressive.

    [Reply]

  • I haven’t heard anyone complaining that it was illegal, just an eye opener for a lot of people.

    BTW, Romney wants to make it so he would even pay lower taxes (not to be interpreted that he wants to modify the tax code for his benefit but that the modifications would greatly benefit someone like him). From the 01/23/12 debate:

    “I want to eliminate the tax on savings, interest, dividends, and capital gains. And I will lower corporate tax and reshape the complex and intrusive tax code.”

    @TheQueen, I understand what you are saying but I don’t think that paying such a small percentage in taxes for anyone – not just Romney – is offset by charitable donations, regardless of the amount. Let’s not forget, donations reduce taxable income even more which in turn reduces the amount of taxes paid.

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  • Just saw this on Democracy Now and thought you might find it interesting – scroll about 1/3 of the way down before the transcript starts:

    http://www.democracynow.org/2012/1/24/as_romney_releases_tax_returns

    [Reply]

  • I agree. With every single word. The United States of Jesus Christ! HAHAHA!

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  • Nancy:

    Romney has already paid taxes on every dollar in those offshore accounts and his investments. it’s not like he got paid a salary and then didn’t pay his taxes or paid a low rate on those taxes. Hes paying a lower rate because all of that money is In investment accounts, which are taxed at a lower rate. But before ANY or that money was put in those accounts, it was taxed at his normal income tax rate when he earned it. Why should he have to pay more for being a smart investor? If everyone had to start paying higher taxes on interest and dividend, no one would have money left for their own retirement funds.

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  • Beth:

    When you look at Romney’s charitable contributions, keep in mind a large percentage went to his own foundations.

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  • Katie,

    I agree with you 100%. Unfortunately, most people don’t fully understand our tax system. That is why I just wrote and published an article that explains how each candidate’s proposed tax plan (including Obama’s) would affect the average American family and/or worker. Check it out here: http://codebluepolitics.com/2012/01/24/gop-contenders-tax-plans-robin-hood-in-reverse/. I’d love to know your thoughts. :-)

    Warm regards,

    Sarah Hackley
    http://www.themigrainechronicles.wordpress.com
    http://www.sarahhackley.com/blog

    [Reply]

  • “Blame Congress. And in November, elect officials who are going to represent the will of the people, not the will of the elite.”

    Ya know, I totally would have let this post slide, if you hadn’t said this. But our votes do not count. If we had our own personal lobbyist then, yes, vote early and vote often in November.

    Until campaigns are not ruled by the free speech that is money (thanks to the Supremes, google Citizens United) your vote doesn’t matter nearly as much as the money that comes from the lobbyists that comes from the special interests that have nothing to do with your vote.

    We just have to get enough people Mad As Hell and Not Going To Take It Any More! before we can change that. Check out Move to Amend…your vote may not matter but your voice COUNTS!

    I’m waiting patiently….

    [Reply]

    Katie Reply:

    @Kathy, Votes DO matter. If everyone voted instead of 20% of the country, the elections would take an entirely different turn. If we got everyone out to vote, the will of the people would be represented, or at least the will of more people. We cannot say votes don’t matter if we never get people to cast them.

    [Reply]

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Welcome!
I'm Katie, a 30-year-old, wife, mom, former teacher-turned PT, who also had brain surgery in November of 2007. This blog chronicles my daily life, from mundane to crazy, often with far too much detail. Sit down, get comfortable and stay for a while.
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